New storage subsystem and new CI

Storage is one of these very simple functionality that actually ends up being quite hard to implement properly. It is also one of these functionality that is never acutely needed, it is possible to hack around it, so it gets pushed to be implemented later. Later is now, we have now implemented a generic persistent storage subsystem in the Crazyflie.

In Crazyflie 1.0, we originally stored settings in a setting block in flash and required the bootloader to change the settings. When designing Crazyflie 2.0 we added an I2C EEPROM to make it easier to store settings, though until now we only stored a fix config block very similar to the one stored in the Crazyflie 1 and that only contained basic radio settings and tuning. This implementation is hard to evolve since the data structure is fixed in one point of the code.

What is now implemented is a generic key-buffer database stored in the I2C EEPROM. From the API user point of view, it is now possible to store, retrieve and delete a buffer using a string as a key. This allows any subsystem, or apps, in the Crazyflie to easily store and retrieve their own config blocks. There is 7KB of space available for storage in the EEPROM.

The first user of this new storage subsystem is the Lighthouse driver. The storage is used to store lighthouse basestation geometries and calibration data, this allows to configure a Crazyflie for a system/lab and have it running out of the box even after a restart.

A future use-case would be to implement stored-parameters: we have been thinking about implementing optional persistence for the parameters for a long time. This would allow to modify and then store new default values for any parameters already present in the Crazyflie. This would allow to very easily implement things like custom controller tuning in a quad made from a bolt for example.

At low level, we where hopping to be able to find a ready-to-use library or file system to store data in our small EEPROM, but unfortunately we did not find anything that would fit our needs. We then had to implement our own storage format.

The low level structure is documented in the Crazyflie firmware repos. Basically the data are stored as a table of “length-key-value” entries with a possibility for an entry to he a “hole”. When new buffers are added they are added at the end of the table and when they are deleted they are replaced by a hole. When the end of the table is reached, the table is de-fragmented by removing the holes and moving the data as much as possible to the beginning of the memory. This structure works very well for an EEPROM and could even be adapted to work well on FLASH.

New CI

When we started activating continuous integration/automatic build to our GitHub repos we did so using Travis CI for firmware builds and AppVeyor for windows builds. However, the GitHub CI offering, GitHub actions, has become quite complete lately and now supports Linux, Windows as well as MacOS builds.

We have now transitioned to GitHub actions for all our repos and we will also implement most of the release process using GitHub actions as well. This will hopefully streamline the release process and allow us to release new version of our projects more often.

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