Author: Arnaud

For quite a while now, I have been very interested in the Rust programming language and since Jonas joined us we are two rust-enthusiast at Bitcraze. Rust is a relatively recent programming language that aims at being safe, performant and productive. It is a system programming language in the sense that it compiles to machine code with minimal runtime. It prevents a lot of bugs at compile time and it provides great mechanisms for abstraction that makes it sometime feels as high level as languages like Python.

I have been interested in applying my love for Rust at Bitcraze, mostly during fun Fridays. There is two area that I have mainly explored so far: Putting Rust in embedded systems to replace pieces of C, having such a high-level-looking language in embedded is refreshing, and re-writing the Crazyflie lib on PC in rust to make it more performant and more portable. In this blog post I will talk about the later, I keep embedded rust for a future blog post :).

Re-implementing Crazyflie lib

To re-implement the Crazyflie lib, the easiest it to follow the way the communication stack is currently setup, more information can be found on Crtp in a pevious blog post about the Crazyflie radio communication and the communication reliability.

Since I am currently focusing on implementing communication using the Crazyradio dongle, I have separated the implementation in the following modules (A crate is the Rust version of a library):

This organization is very similar to the layering that we have in the python crazyflie-lib, the difference being that in the Crazyflie lib all the layers are distributed in the same Python package.

At the time this blog post is written, the Crazyradio crate is full featured. The link is in a good shape and even has a python binding. The Crazyflie lib however is still very much work in progress. I started by implementing the ‘hard’ parts like log and param but more directly useful part like set-points (what is needed to actually fly the Crazyflie) are not implemented yet.

Compiling to the web: Wasm

One of the nice property of Rust is that compiling to different platform is generally easy and seemless. For instance, all the crates talked about previously will compile and run on Windows/Mac/Linux without any modification including the Python binding using only the standard Rust install. One of the Rust supported platform is a bit more special and interesting compared to the other though: WebAssembly.

WebAssembly is a virtual machine that is designed to be targeted by system programming language like C/C++ and Rust. It can be used in standalone (a bit like the Java VM) as well as in a web browses. All modern web browser supports and can run WebAssembly code. WebAssembly can be called from JavaScript.

The WebAssembly in the web is unfortunately not as easy to target as the native Windows/Mac/Linux: WebAssembly does not support threading yet, USB access needs to be handled via WebUSB and since we run in a web browser from JavaScript we have to follow some rules inherited from it. The most important being that the program can never block (ie. std::sync::Mutex shall not be used, I have tried ….).

I made two major modification to my existing code in order to make it possible to run in a web browser:

  • crazyflie-link and crazyflie-lib have been re-implemented using Rust async/await. This means that there is no thread needed and Rust async/await interfaces almost seamlessly with Javascript’s promises. The link and lib still compile and work well on native platforms.
  • I have created a new crate named crazyradio-webusb (not uploaded yet at the release of this post) that exposes the same API as the crazyradio crates but using WebUSB to communicate with the Crazyradio.

To support the web, the relationship between the crates becomes as follow:

The main goal is to keep the crazyflie-lib and crazyflie-link unmodified. Support for the Crazyradio in native and on the web is handled by two crates that exposes the same async API. The crate used is chosen by a compile flag (called Features in the rust world). This architecture could easily be expanded to other platform like Android or iOS.

Status, demo and future work

I have started getting something working end-to-end in the browser. The lib currently only implements Crazyflie Param and the Log TOC so the current demo scans for Crazyflie, connects the first found Crazyflie and prints the list of parameters with the parameters type and values. It can be found on Crazyflie web client test server. This doesn’t do anything useful now, but I am going to update this server when I make progress, so feel free to visit it in the future :).

Note that WebUSB is currently only implemented by Chromium-based browser so Chrome, Chromium and recent Edge. On Windows you need to install the WinUSB driver for the Crazyradio using Zadig. On Linux/Mac/Android it should work out of the box.

The source code for the Web Client is not pushed on Github yet, once it is, it will be named crazyflie-client-web. It is currently mostly implemented in Rust and it will likely mostly be Rust since it is much easier to stick with one (great!) language. One of the plan is to make a javascript API and to push it on NPM, this will then become a Crazyflie lib usable by anyone on the web from JavaScript (or a bit better, TypeScript …).

My goal for now is to implement a clone of the Crazyflie Client flight control tab on the web. This would provide a nice way to get started with the Crazyflie without having to install anything.

A little while ago we made a blog post talking about the communication reliability, one part of this work did include an alternative CRTP link implementation for the Crazyflie lib. This week we will make one of the native CRTP link implementations, the Crazyflie-link-Cpp, the default link for the Crazyflie python lib.

In the Crazyflie communication stack, the CRTP link is the piece of software that handles reliable packet communication between a computer and the Crazyflie. In the Crazyflie it is mainly implemented in the nRF51 radio chip (for the radio link), in the computer it is part of the Crazyflie python lib + Crazyflie client and for Ros and Crazyswarm it is implemented in crazyflie-cpp. Other clients like Lamouchefolle also have re-implemented their own versions of the CRTP link.

The CRTP link is the most critical part in the communication with Crazyflie, if it is not working properly, nothing can work properly, all communication with the Crazyflie passes though the CRTP link. This code duplication in multiple projects means that we have many places for diverging behaviour and creative bugs which makes it hard to develop new clients for the Crazyflie.

One way we are trying to solve this problem is to unify the links: let’s try to use the same link in all the clients. In order to do so we need a link that can act as a minimum common denominator: it needs to work with Python in order to accommodate the Crazyflie Python lib, work with C++ for Crazyswarm and LaMoucheFolle and be high-performance to be able to handle swarms of Crazyflies. The C++ link implementation can full-fill all these requirements using a python binding, and it will give higher performance to the Python lib.

Switching to the native C++ link will give us a lot of benefits:

  • It is higher performance, it has about 20% higher packet throughput than the pure python implementation
  • It will unify the Python lib and Crazyswarm a bit more. Crazyswarm will be able to use the same link as soon as broadcast packet support is added.
  • The Cpp link supports dynamic allocation of radios, no need to choose what radio to use for each connection, the link will distribute connections over all available radios by using a star instead of the radio number (radio://*/80/2M) in the URI.

The biggest drawback so far is that the CPP link needs to be compiled for each platform. We are compiling a python Wheel for it in Github actions for Windows/Mac/Linux on X86_64, any other architecture (including raspberry pi) will use the existing python CRTP link for the time being.

We are in the process of enabling the new link as the default in the lib. There are still some outstanding bugs related to boot loading that needs to be ironed out, but we expect this change to be included in the next release.

We are happy to anounce the availability of the 2021.03 release of the Crazyflie firmware and client! This release includes new binaries for the Crazyflie (2021.03), the Crazyflie client 2021.03 as well as the Crazyflie python library 0.1.13.2. The firmware package can be downloaded from the Crazyflie release repository (2021.03) or can be flashed directly using the client bootloader window. The firmware package contains the STM firmware (2021.03), the NRF firmware (2021.03) and the Lighthouse deck FPGA binary (V6).

The main feature in this release is the stabilization of the Lighthouse positioning system. The main work done has been on the system setup and management, it has taken a lot of work spawning all the projects and a brunch of documentation, but we think we have reached a stage where the lighthouse positioning system is working very well and is very easy to setup and get working. We have now published the new Lighthouse getting started guide and will be working this week at updating all required materials to mark Lighthouse as released!

When the Lighthouse positioning system was released in early access, it required to install SteamVR, run some custom scripts and flash a modified firmware to get up and running. This has been improved slightly over time with scripts that allows to setup the system without using SteamVR and some way to store the required system data in the Crazyflie configuration memory rather than hard-coded in the firmware. With this release, everything is coming together and it is now possible to go from zero to an autonomous Crazyflie flying in a lighthouse system in minutes by just using the Crazyflie client.

Another major improvement made to support the lighthouse is the modification of the bootloader Crazyflie update sequence in the client as well as in command line. The new sequence will restart the Crazyflie a couple of times while upgrading the Crazyflie, this allows for an upgrade of the firmware in the installed decks if required. The lighthouse deck firmware has been added to the Crazyflie .zip release file and will be flashed into the deck while flashing the release to a Crazyflie that has the deck installed.

An alternative, robust TDoA implementation has been added for the Loco Positioning System. This change has been contributed by williamwenda on Github and can optionally be enabled at runtime.

An event subsystem has also been added to the firmware. It allows to log events onto the SD-Card which can be very useful when acquiring positioning data from the various positioning system supported by the Crazyflie. We have described this subsystem in an earlier blog post.

There has also been a lot of smaller improvement and bugfixes in this release. See the individual project releases not for more information.

We hope you are going to enjoy this new Crazyflie and lighthouse release. Do not hesitate to drop a comment here, questions on the forum if you have any or bug reports of github in the (very unlikely ;-) event that there are bugs left.

Storage is one of these very simple functionality that actually ends up being quite hard to implement properly. It is also one of these functionality that is never acutely needed, it is possible to hack around it, so it gets pushed to be implemented later. Later is now, we have now implemented a generic persistent storage subsystem in the Crazyflie.

In Crazyflie 1.0, we originally stored settings in a setting block in flash and required the bootloader to change the settings. When designing Crazyflie 2.0 we added an I2C EEPROM to make it easier to store settings, though until now we only stored a fix config block very similar to the one stored in the Crazyflie 1 and that only contained basic radio settings and tuning. This implementation is hard to evolve since the data structure is fixed in one point of the code.

What is now implemented is a generic key-buffer database stored in the I2C EEPROM. From the API user point of view, it is now possible to store, retrieve and delete a buffer using a string as a key. This allows any subsystem, or apps, in the Crazyflie to easily store and retrieve their own config blocks. There is 7KB of space available for storage in the EEPROM.

The first user of this new storage subsystem is the Lighthouse driver. The storage is used to store lighthouse basestation geometries and calibration data, this allows to configure a Crazyflie for a system/lab and have it running out of the box even after a restart.

A future use-case would be to implement stored-parameters: we have been thinking about implementing optional persistence for the parameters for a long time. This would allow to modify and then store new default values for any parameters already present in the Crazyflie. This would allow to very easily implement things like custom controller tuning in a quad made from a bolt for example.

At low level, we where hopping to be able to find a ready-to-use library or file system to store data in our small EEPROM, but unfortunately we did not find anything that would fit our needs. We then had to implement our own storage format.

The low level structure is documented in the Crazyflie firmware repos. Basically the data are stored as a table of “length-key-value” entries with a possibility for an entry to he a “hole”. When new buffers are added they are added at the end of the table and when they are deleted they are replaced by a hole. When the end of the table is reached, the table is de-fragmented by removing the holes and moving the data as much as possible to the beginning of the memory. This structure works very well for an EEPROM and could even be adapted to work well on FLASH.

New CI

When we started activating continuous integration/automatic build to our GitHub repos we did so using Travis CI for firmware builds and AppVeyor for windows builds. However, the GitHub CI offering, GitHub actions, has become quite complete lately and now supports Linux, Windows as well as MacOS builds.

We have now transitioned to GitHub actions for all our repos and we will also implement most of the release process using GitHub actions as well. This will hopefully streamline the release process and allow us to release new version of our projects more often.

Following firmware releases we have now released a new version for the Crazyflie client and python lib (cflib). It took a bit more time to test and fix various last minute bugs but we now have released Crazyflie client 2020.09 as well as Crazyflie lib 0.12.1.

Crazyflie python lib 0.12.1

The main new funcitonalities of the lib are:

  • Python 2.x support is now dropped. Python 2 official support has ended beginning of this year and it is not installed by default in Ubuntu 20.04, it was time to stop supporting it in cflib
  • Some documentation work
  • Capabilities to abort a bootloading operation

Crazyflie client 2020.09

There has been a brunch of cosmetic and functional changes in the client. Some themes have been added so that the client can now be used with a dark blue or even green-on black hacker theme. The used Qt theme has also been forced to be drawn by Qt on all platforms: this means that the client will not look like a Windows or Mac app on Windows and Mac, but the styling will be consistent on all platform. This will simplify development and make documentation consistent with all platform.

The bootloader has been changed to automatically download releases of the firmware from Github by default. This is a great quality of life feature made by victor this summer that makes it very easy to run Crazyflies with a clean release build.

New bootloader window

There are also a brunch of bugfixes, the full changelog can be read on the release page.

Future plans

Semantic versioning for the lib

We have been thinking of using semantic versioning for the lib and bumping the version to 1.0. This will allow us to communicate the state of the lib more accurately: it is not perfect but it is perfectly usable. As well giving more freedom to break compatibility. A lot of things could be made better but we are always very careful not breaking backwards compatibility. Proper semantic versioning would allow us to make a Crazyflie client lib 2.0 making it clear that if you update from 1.0 to 2.0 you might have to make changes to your scripts.

Client binary release for more platform

So far, the Crazyflie client has had a binary release for Windows and some work to make one for MacOS. By Binary release we mean releasing the client in a form that does not require installing python, and then the crazyflie client pip package, on Windows it is an installer and on Mac it would be an app bundle.

Last week we have also been working on Linux releases, after all most of us uses Linux at Bitcraze so we might as well show it some love. Today we have released a snap of Crazyflie client. This means that you can install Crazyflie client from the Ubuntu software application on Ubuntu, or directly via the snap install –edge cfclient command on any Linux system with snap installed. There is still some rough edges, and a stable version will only be available for next release, but this should make it much easier to get started with the Crazyflie.

I am back from parental leave and during this time I tried not to think too much about Crazyflie-related things to get a little break. However, over time, while geeking around, I eventually ended-up back to Crazyflie and Crazyradio designing a new channel-hopping communication protocol. This will likely be the subject of a future blog post but for the time being I thought I could write a bit about how the current Crazyflie radio communication is working.

Protocol layers

Like Many protocols, the Crazyflie communication protocol is layered. This allows to plug different elements at each level. When it comes to a Crazyflie client talking to a Crazyflie over the radio, the layering looks as follow:

Services are high-level functionalities like log that allows to get values of Crazyflie variables at regular interval. At this level there is essencially an API with commands like addLogBlock.

CRTP is a protocol that encapsulates the commands for each sevices. It multiplexes packets on the link using port numbers, this is very similar to TCP/UDP port on a network, each service is listening and sending packet on a pre-specified port.

Finally the radio link only deals with raw packets. The role of the radio link is to deliver packets from the PC to the Crazyflie and vice-versa. At this level, we have many link implementations, the most used are the radio and the USB link but there also is a Serial link that uses the Crazyflie serial port.

Radio link

The radio link is currently implemented by the Crazyradio (PA) on the PC side and the Crazyflie on the other side. The Crazyradio uses a nordic semiconductor nRF24LU1 USB/Radio chip and the Crazyflie a nRF51822 MCU/Radio. This is importance since, while the nRF51 has a quite flexible radio, the nRF24 does use a standalone SPI radio that has most of the packet handling hard-coded to a protocol that nordic call Enhanced Shockburst (ESB).

The ESB protocol handles sending packet and receiving acknowledgement automatically. A packet is sent on a radio channel, using a 5 bytes address, and when this packet is received on the other side an acknowledgement is sent back using the same address on the same channel. Both the original packet and the acknowledgement can contain a payload.

To implement a bi-directional radio link, the crazyradio is the one sending packets and the Crazyflies continuously listens and, when receiving a packet, sends back an ack. We do use the payload capabilities of both packet we send and of the ack to implement an uplink (PC->Crazyflie) and downlink (Crazyflie->PC) data link.

Of course, one problem with this setup is that while the PC can decide to send a packet at any moment, the Crazyflie needs to wait for the PC to send a packet to have a chance to send one back in an ACK. To make sure the Crazyflie has enough opportunity to send packets back, we are sending packets regular interval to the Crazyflie even if there is no packet to be sent. This polling allows to implement a continuous downlink.

The most important to see here is that the radio link gives to the upper layer, the CRTP layer, the illusion of a full duplex link. On the radio side this is implemented by polling regularly for downlink packets.

Communicating with multiple Crazyflies

In order to communicate with multiple Crazyflie, we just send packet to each Crazyflies one after each-other. This way we give equal chance for each Crazyflie to send back packets and doing so we divide the available bandwidth between them.

The main advantage of the polling protocol versus a more traditional P2P protocol where the Crazyflies would send when they want, is that when using polling the Crazyradio is the master and we can guarantee that we are not introducing any packet collision when we communicate.

Limitation and future

One major limitation of the current protocol is that it communicates on a single channel and requires the user to set manually channel and address for each Crazyflies. This means that the user has to tinker with parameters to find a good channel and has to manually handle all addressing.

Another limitation is that the polling is done over USB by python or, in case of ROS/Crazyswarm, in C++. This adds the USB latency to the equation and complexifies the client implementation.

I have been working on defining a new protocol that would be implemented efficiently in a Crazyradio and that would implement addressing and channel hopping. The idea is to get closer to a connection style more like bluetooth low energy where you do not have to care about channels and setting address, you just connect your device. Unlike BLE though, this protocol will be optimized for low latency. Stay tuned, we will likely talk about that more in future posts :-).

We are happy to announce that we have gotten Crazyflie 2 to fly autonomously using the Lighthouse deck and Lighthouse V2 base-stations. This was a very requested features, and while this is not stable and ready to use yet, it is a great milestone toward Lighthouse V2 support.

There exists two incompatible versions of the Lighthouse positioning system. Version 1 was released with the original HTC Vive VR system. In this system base-station are using two rotating laser beam that sweeps the room, one horizontal and one vertical, and an omnidirectional synchronization flash to allow IR light receiver to be located in the room. One limitation of this version is that up to two base-station can be used and no more, this is mainly due to the fact that beam identification is done using a TDMA scheme: base stations switch-on their laser in a dedicated time-slot one after each-other and adding more time slots for more base-stations will greatly reduce the update rate of the system.

Lighthouse V2, was released with the HTC Vive PRO headset and is also used by the Valve Index. The big change is that laser sweeps now carries modulated data and that there is only one rotor with two angled slit instead of the two rotors for V1. The V2 sweep data is described as ‘Sync on beam’ and contains timing information of how long it has been since the synchronization event (ie. when the rotor crossed 0 degree). The sweep data also allows to identify the base-station that has transmitted the sweep. This removes the need for an omni-directional synchronization pulse and allows more than two base-station to operate at the same time in the same space, since their sweeps can now be identified and timed.

The lighthouse V2 system is very elegant and scalable. However, actually decoding the signal from the sweeps has taken a lot of time since it is not documented and we needed to find-out what the encoding actually was. There has been effort on the internet to understand how the system worked, the most useful one is this github ticket that goes from raw data acquisition to fully unlocking the beam encoding.

I have been working on-and-off for a long time on making an FPGA design for the lighthouse deck to acquire and decode Lighthouse V2. The main blocking point until now was that I had not been able to reliably acquire useful signal from the system in order to allow real-time decoding on the Crazyflie. Added to that, there was some inconsistency between what we though the system was doing and what we could gather from the base-stations debug console. Recently though, the last piece of the puzzle, was to discover that the beam encoding was not Manchester, as we though, but Bi-phase mark code FM1 (BMC). Once this decoding was used everything made sense and worked.

Added to that, I started using SpinalHDL instead of raw Verilog to write the FPGA design which allows for much quicker iteration, much less frustration, and it also allowed me to easily make the design multi-clock which is required to decode the BMC signal: the beam decoder runs at 48MHz, and the rest of the system works at 24MHz. This design is required since the FPGA we use in the lighthouse deck is not fast enough to run everything at 48MHz.

The result, is a new FPGA firmware for the lighthouse deck that receives, identify and decode Lighthouse V2 sweep signal and send them over to the Crazyflie. The Crazyflie still has a little pulse packing to do (putting together pulses from a single sweep received on multiple sensors) and then can use pulse timing information to calculate azimuth and elevation at which the base-station sees the Crazyflie. This information is the same as the one we get from Lighthouse V1 and so the same algorithm can be used to calculate the Crazyflie position.

I hacked a proof of concept was this last fun Friday and it flies!

If anyone is curious the code for this demo has been uploaded as an out-of-tree driver and the code for the FPGA parts is already in the lighthouse-fpga project. The current Crazyflie code is too incomplete to be usable, but it is a nice starting point if anyone wants to play with Lighthouse V2 and the Crazyflie right away ;-).

As a side note, the Bitcraze team will shrink temporary as I, Arnaud, will go in parental leave until mid-August. I look forward to this new adventure and I trust the lighthouse V2 development and the forum will be in good hands in my absence.

We are currently finishing production test design for a couple of expansion decks and we figured we never wrote about it and about the more general board production process. In this blog post we wanted to talk a bit about how we test boards in the productions phase, taking as an example the forthcoming active marker deck.

The active marker deck

When finalizing an electronic board, we send to the manufacturer documentation that allows to manufacture & assemble a, hopefully, functional board. Although we assume that the individual components are in working order, the problem is that the assembling is not always perfect, so we need to check that everything we do is actually working,. This is what the production test is solving.

The first thing is to find out what to test, for that we need a strategy. The strategy we have been using is to test every step where we have modified or work on: for example we will test all the connections we have soldered in the manufacturing process. We will normally not test all the functionalities of ready-made module. For example, following this strategy, we will usually test all communication interface we have cabled, but we will not test all functionalities of a microcontroller we solder on the board, these are deemed to be already tested and working by the microcontroller manufacturer. This step usually end up with an annotated schematic:

Annoted schematics of ActiveMarker Deck

Once we know what to test and roughly how to test it, we document a test rig that will be able to run the tests automatically. Some tests are generic and applicable to all our boards, for example we do test voltages with a multi-meter on every board that has a regulator. Some tests are very board specific. For example, for the active marker deck we want to test IR LEDs and an IR detector, we define a test rig that has reflector to reflect the LED to the detector and we will use the onboard detector to test the LEDs:

Simple block diagram of the test rig for the ActiveMarker Deck

We are normally using a Crazyflie on all our test rig, since it is usually possible to test all functionality from the deck port. We also try as much as possible to integrate the test software into the real software. For the active marker deck it meant adding 38KHz modulated output mode to the LEDs in order to emit a signal detectable by the detector, which will make it to the final firmware. Finally, we have a test software, running on the test computer, that uses the Crazyflie python lib to talk to the Crazyflie and run the test. The last step of all the test is to write the deck One Wire identification memory so that it can be detected by a Crazyflie.

Screenshot of the test program for the test engineer

From these specification, the manufacturer can then build a test rig and start testing boards, non-passing board will be re-worked until they pass or discarded.

Test rig for the Multi-ranger expansion deck

What we have learned in our years at Bitcraze is that testing phase is the most important part of the development process of PCB. Therefore, the earliest we already start thinking about the production tests in the board design, the more smooth the final phase of production of our new products will be.

We talked about it in a previous post, it is more than time to implement a higher abstraction layer for the Crazyflie firmware to make it easy to implement custom automations and programs on top of the flying platform. In this post we will try to explain the state of the art and where we are thinking of heading. This is mostly a request for comments and we are creating a github ticket to discuss about it.

DELFT – Zwerm Drones TU Delft. – FOTO GUUS SCHOONEWILLE

The out-of-tree build and P2P API presented in the previous post is a great start: it allows to make project on top of the Crazyflie firmware that can easily be maintained over time and to communicate directly between Crazyflie without having a PC in the loop. Though we have not completely solved or documented the API that can be called by the programs written on top of the Crazyflie, this is what the APP-layer is supposed to provide.

The current plan for the app layer is to make the same functionality that is available in the Python crazyflie lib API, accessible from within the Crazyflie firmware, using similar API calls. This way we get the possibility of prototyping functionality in python code on a remote machine, and when it is working, easily convert it to an app onboard. This is already implemented, in part, for the log and param API as well as for the low level parts of the commander. It has enabled us to write programs like the multiranger push demo and SGBA from Kimberly’s paper. The API is not yet documented properly and the function calls do not look like the ones on the python lib side at this time, but our intention is to converge the APIs over time.

We think that having the same level of functionality for Log, Param and Commander within a Crazyflie app, as in the python API, will already allow to implement a lot of onboard programs much more easily than has been possible until now. If there is anything else you think would be interesting to develop in this field, do not hesitate to drop a comment in this post or in the github issue.

Over time the scope of Crazyflie has changed a lot. At first, Crazyflie was “just flying” with the only possible control was attitude (roll, pitch, yaw) and thrust setpoint sent from the Radio. Soon after, autonomous flight was investigated, first by implementing position controller outside Crazyflie and then, over time, moving position control on-board and sending position or trajectory setpoint to the Crazyflie. Now that the Crazyflie has good position control, the next step is to implement autonomous behavior and until now the most practical way is to do this from code running in an external computer. Similarly to what happened in the history of position control (first off-board and now onboard), it needs to be possible implement autonomous behavior in the Crazyflie itself. This blog post is about two newly implemented capabilities that will allow to implement automation in the Crazyflie firmware in an easy and maintainable way, namely the ‘App layer’ and the P2P communication.

App layer

The “App layer” is a term we have been using internally in Bitcraze to describe a set of functionalities that would allow to implement code in the Crazyflie. This includes the infrastructure to compile and maintain external code running in the Crazyflie as well as a set of API to control flight and behavior from C code rather than from radio communication.

Last week we implemented the first step of the App layer: the infrastructure part. It is now possible to build the Crazyflie firmware out-of-tree. This means that it is now possible, from a project, to point to the Crazyflie firmware folder and to compile a firmware from the project folder without touching the Crazyflie firmware folder. Practically it allows to create a git-repos implementing custom firmware code that has Crazyflie firmware as a sub-repos. This makes the maintenance of custom firmware code much easier than maintaining a branch of the Crazflie firmware as previously required.

A second piece that has been implemented is the app entry-point. It allows to start running code by just creating an “appMain()” function. The function will be called from a dedicated FreeRTOS task after the Crazyflie has initialized and started. This should make it much easier to get started.

For an example, we have extracted the multiranger push demo into a standalone git repos. This demonstrate the implementation of autonomous behavior using these new infrastructures.

Peer to Peer communication

The Crazyflie has been used for many research related to swarming, some examples are the crazyswarm project or the work done by Carnegie Mellon University. However, it is now time to turn it up a notch. On the forum and on the Github repository, there has been several request of enabling direct peer to peer communication to the Crazyflies. Now we finally found time to work on it and implement some basic functionality on the NRF and STM side of the firmware.

Currently, it is possible to send and receive a P2P packet in broadcast mode from the STM directly (see how to do this in the documentation). This enables data to be send from one Crazyflie to another with a maximum data size of 60 bytes. We were able to stress-test this with our test rig, by sending broadcast messages in a round-robin-kind of fashion, where the broadcast message was transferred through 10 Crazyflies in 10-20 ms. Even-though the current implementation is for now very minimal, we were able to fix some existing issues in the radiolink framework.

We will not stop there, as we are hoping to implement a communication system similar to how the CTRP protocol has been implemented. We are getting a lot of help by our active community members, so check out this github issue to be up-to-date with the current discussion.